Fatal Wreck

Transcription of newspaper article from the L'Anse sentinel (L'Anse, Mich.), Jan. 2, 1892, regarding the Duluth, South Shore, and Atlantic Railway company., L'Anse sentinel (L'Anse, Mich.), Source:  The L'Anse Sentinel L'Anse, L. S., Mi. January 2, 1892   Saturday  A Fatal Wreck  About eight o'clock Saturday morning a fatal wreck occurred between Humboldt and Champion caused by a head end collision of east bound copper train No. 31 and west bound train No. 53.  No. 53 was late at Humboldt and asked the ttain dispatcher at Marqeutte for help against No. 32.  Their proper passing place was Champion and by holding No. 32 there five minutes it would save No. 53 a half hour.  When No. 32 pulled into Champion she did not stop at the depot, as the order board was not out, but went on down to the junction switch and took on some cars.  Immediately after No. 32 passed the depot the Champion operator received word that orders were coming.  He then threw out the order board and notified Marquette of the fact.  Orders weere then received to hold No. 32, as No. 53 would pass at that place.  Now before No. 32 passed out her crew should have looked back to see if the order board was out.  They claimed they did and theat the board wasn't out, or if it was, the storm was so dense they couldn't see it, so pulled out having the right of way as an east bound train over other trains of the same class.  William Reany, engineer of No. 32 says, that they were traveling along at a pretty rapid gait when something loomed up ahead of them.  There was not ime to jump so fiving a cry of warning slid off from his seat.  The next instant he was flying through the air from the schock while his face was bleeding from cuts caused by flying glass.  The case was about the same with Herrick, only he was scalded.  The others hurt were:  Helliger was on NO. 53's engine, caught between cab and engine, instantly killed.  Payette and Van Oppen were found under the tender, one was unhurt and crying for help.  The other Van Oppen, lay buried under the coal, having met instant death.  TWo engines, three box cars, two gondolas, one or two flats and about 10 20-ton ore cars were mixed up in the crash.  The remainder of each train escaping.  The damage to the engine was the most serious feature of property loss, as the repairs will cost between $3,000 and $4,000.
Abstract/Description: Transcription of newspaper article from the L'Anse sentinel (L'Anse, Mich.), Jan. 2, 1892, regarding the Duluth, South Shore, and Atlantic Railway company.
Subject(s): Railroads
L'Anse (Mich.)
Duluth, South Shore, and Atlantic Railway Company
Date Created: 1892-01-02