Lumbering st and point

Transcription of newspaper article from the Mining Journal (Marquette, Mich.), Dec. 4, 1886, regarding the effect of the Duluth, South Shore, and Atlantic Railway extension on the lumber industry in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan., Electronic reproduction of: Transcription of newspaper article : Mining journal (Marquette, Mich.), Dec. 4, 1886., source: The Mining Journal Marquette, Mi. December 4, 1886  Considering the project from a lumbering st and point, the Northwestern Lumberman has this as to one of the probably results of the construction of The DSS and A:  The proposed building of The DSS and A from Ashl and , Wi., to Marquette, Mi. has set the pine timber men to thinking. There is a strip of Ontonagon county, Mi., extending from Montreal river on the west to the Iron river on the east, about 50 miles long and 30 miles wide, which is spattered all over with pine that has not as yet been more that partially explored, and not at all estimated, except in isolated instances on the Black and Iron rivers. The whole region is practically unknown to the stumpage buyers. It is so situated that log operators and mill builders have not sought the region as an eligible locality for the lumber industry. Until the NLS and W penetrated the   southern limit of the belt there was no rail communication nearer than Ashl and  and Ontonagon. The Iron, Presque Isle, Black and Mont- real rivers make a rapid descent a short distance before emptying into Lake Superior, so that log driving to mills that might be located on the lake has always been considered impossible, unless by construction chutes around the various falls. In order to make this pine region accessible it is necessary to have an east and west railroad, that should run but a few miles - say eight to twelve - back from luke Superior. Where the road should crpss the streams mills could be constructed, either to be propelled by water or steam; water- power would be abundant. A railroad and mills thus located would secure these advantages: The mills would be above the main falls of the streams, which would make it feasible to bring down the logs by floatage, and the railroad would furnish means of sending the mill product to market.  It is probable that the men who have the south shore project in h and  underst and  the situation, and will locate the road where it will do the most good. In thus locating the line what will be of of advantage to mill men will confer a like benefit on the owners of the railroad. At any rate the line will run through the pine re- gion referred to, and will open it up to the attention and oper- ations of log operators and manufacturers. Alternate sections of this territory are "canal l and s," now owned by the Ayer estate, but the pine on such l and s can be purchased. We may expect to see a gr and  rush made for stumpage and pine l and s in this region when it shall become fully known that a railroad is to built through it. Thriving mill towns will also spring up at points where the road shall cross the streams. Good judges think the country is also full of mineral.
Abstract/Description: Transcription of newspaper article from the Mining Journal (Marquette, Mich.), Dec. 4, 1886, regarding the effect of the Duluth, South Shore, and Atlantic Railway extension on the lumber industry in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.
Subject(s): Railroads
Marquette (Mich.)
Duluth, South Shore, and Atlantic Railway Company
Date Created: 1886-12-04