Chapin Mine pit

An oversized postcard view by Nels M. Nelson, Iron Mountain photographer, early in the second decade of the
twentieth century shows the Chapin cave-in or pit looking northeast from the Ludington Shaft area. The Hamilton
Shaft complex appears near the center where the smokestack belches black smoke. Ground around the Chapin
Mine began settling as early as 1885. A book entitled Michigan and Its Resources published in 1893 by the
Secretary of State noted over 4,000,000 tons of iron ore had been extracted from the Chapin, and illustrated this
immense volume as follows: “to convey the total product of this one mine in railroad cars, such as are used for
carrying ore from the mines to the docks, would require a train of 218,327 20-ton cars, which at twenty-three feet
in length would cover a distance of 5,022,441 feet, or 951 miles. About the distance between New York City and
Chicago.” No wonder the Chapin cave-in was so immense! "10. Chapin Cave. Iron Mountain, Mich.; Nelson's Photo" is printed on the photo. [Menominee Range Historical Museum], Item also published with caption in: Dickinson County, Michigan : from earliest times through the Twenties / compiled and edited by William John Cummings. Iron Mountain, Mich. : Dickinson County Board of Commissioners, 1991. 432 p. : ill, maps, ports. ; 3
Abstract/Description: An oversized postcard view by Nels M. Nelson, Iron Mountain photographer, early in the second decade of the twentieth century shows the Chapin cave-in or pit looking northeast from the Ludington Shaft area. The Hamilton Shaft complex appears near the center where the smokestack belches black smoke. Ground around the Chapin Mine began settling as early as 1885. A book entitled Michigan and Its Resources published in 1893 by the Secretary of State noted over 4,000,000 tons of iron ore had been extracted from the Chapin, and illustrated this immense volume as follows: “to convey the total product of this one mine in railroad cars, such as are used for carrying ore from the mines to the docks, would require a train of 218,327 20-ton cars, which at twenty-three feet in length would cover a distance of 5,022,441 feet, or 951 miles. About the distance between New York City and Chicago.” No wonder the Chapin cave-in was so immense! "10. Chapin Cave. Iron Mountain, Mich.; Nelson's Photo" is printed on the photo. [Menominee Range Historical Museum]
Subject(s): Mines and mineral resources
Mine shafts
Iron Mountain (Mich.)
Date Created: 1920 (approximate)